FROM PARIS TO VENICE: A PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNEY BY WILLY RONIS

The exhibition is now extended to October 27, 2019.

“All the attention is fixed on a unique moment, almost too good to be true, which can evaporate in the next second and provokes a feeling that is impossible to obtain using staged artifices.”     

— Willy Ronis, June 1956

Reporter, industrial photographer and illustrator, Willy Ronis (1910–2009) was one of the key figures of twentieth-century French photography. For eight decades, from the 1930s to the 2000s, he pointed his camera lens at the French people, criss-crossing the streets of the capital or the south of the country with a perpetually-renewed pleasure. A photographer of joyful happenstance, Ronis captured the “slices of everyday life” of his family and friends, such as his wife Marie-Anne or his sonVincent, but also strangers who he came across while taking a detour through the streets of Belleville. A member of the Groupe des XV, he vigorously and passionately defended the career of photographer. In 1951, his work gained broader recognition during an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, where it was shown alongside works by Cartier-Bresson, Brassaï, Doisneau and Izis.

The photographic prints in this exhibition are on loan from the Médiathèque de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine collection, which houses the 108,000 negatives, 9000 slides, 20,300 prints and 6 albums of the photographer’s reference prints, as well as his contact sheets, archives (diaries, handwritten texts, personal and professional letters) and library. Ronis always considered the context in which his works were reproduced as being crucial, along with the accompanying notes. Therefore, some of the most important works on display here are coupled with comments or quotes from the photographer, drawn from the six photobooks that he published beginning in 1985.

Carefully selected from the enormous oeuvre Ronis left behind, our exhibition offers an overview of the famous photographer’s work, the photographic genre he helped to create and the iconic views and pictorial compositions that assisted formulating the romantic imagery of Paris and other places that we hold dear today. This project is a collaboration between the University Museum and Art Gallery of the University of Hong kong and Alliance Française in Hong Kong and the Jeu de Paume, a National Museum in Paris. We would like to thank all of the team members for our fruitful collaboration and express our gratitude to the French consulate, BNP Paribas and Le French May for their generous support.

— Co-curators: Matthieu Rivallin and Florian Knothe


Exhibitions and events

Nestorian Crosses of the Yuan Dynasty

Permanent exhibition

The University of Hong Kong’s (HKU) Nestorian crosses were assembled by a Mr. F. A. Nixon who served as a British postal commissioner in Beijing in the 1930s and 1940s. Subsequently the collection...

LIVING KOGEI: CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CRAFT FROM THE ISE COLLECTION

Temporary exhibition at University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong until 03.11.2019

The exhibition is now extended to November 3, 2019. The modern Japanese term for artisan crafts,  kogei  (pronounced ‘ko-gay’) refers to a form of highly skilled artistic expression...

[GUIDED VIEWING] GUIDED VIEWING OF "LIVING KOGEI: CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CRAFT FROM THE ISE COLLECTION" WITH BEN CHIESA AND “FROM PARIS TO VENICE: A PHOTOGRAPHIC JOURNEY BY WILLY RONIS” WITH DR. FLORIAN KNOTHE

Event at University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong on 21.09.2019 11:00

[GUIDED VIEWING AND LECTURE] Guided viewing of  Living Kogei: Contemporary Japanese Craft from the Ise Collection  with Ben Chiesa. Talk on  Hou Beiren and Splashed Ink – A Sideways...

[工作坊] 竹杯墊工作坊

Event at University Museum and Art Gallery, The University of Hong Kong on 21.09.2019 14:00

承接《鐵筆之藝術:明清竹雕》展覽,香港美術博物館現正舉辦《藝流不息:伊勢文化財團藏日本當代工藝》,除展出玻璃、漆器、陶瓷、金屬外,亦再度呈獻竹雕作品,從而由另一國度探視竹藝在不同地區的發展、精神和表現形式。 工作坊導師將會教授如何運用竹蔑和藤條編織杯墊。希望参加者透過手工製作,進一步了解竹的特性,體驗藝術源於生活的理念和創意。...

Show all

Activities from this museum

We don't have anything to show you here.


Suggested Content